She said, he said: The same story?

She said, he said: The same story?

In the post on how to create your life timeline, I suggest you reach out to family and friends to see what they remember of the events you’ve listed. I guarantee, even if you have the best memory, you’ll be surprised and learn something new. Their memories will enrich your storytelling and provide you an opportunity to connect and dig deeper.

For fun and humility I share one of our family stories to illustrate the point of how different perspectives change a story. It’s our version of Christmas mayhem akin to family photo awkward moments.

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Your first concert memory. Does it loom large in your Family History?

Your first concert memory. Does it loom large  in your Family History?

What was the first live concert you attended? This is a common reminiscence with people of all ages. As a recently minted member of AARP, I chuckle when I hear some, as in, “My first concert was Blues Traveler waaaay back in 2005!” My first concert story is a seemingly harmless Sonny and Cher show in 1972, but what I wouldn’t give for a photo of us at the show, and our tickets under glass.

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Step Two: Create your life timeline (your path to empowerment)

Step Two: Create your life timeline (your path to empowerment)

For many, time travel has the appeal of seeing important moments in history, or even to relive an experience and alter future outcomes or consequences.

The great news is that you can travel back in time without the souped-up car, and relive your own memories without the hazard of disrupting them. By tapping into the power of your own stories, photos, and the conversations that bring it all back to the surface, you can relive the best of it all.

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Got Old Photos? Dump them in the trash.

Got Old Photos? Dump them in the trash.

With some sleuthing and organizing work, these photos can be sorted out by the names of the people and places they picture. Your treasures can be salvaged, and handed down to the people you love. Take note of the year, and your photos can even be sorted chronologically to piece together a family timeline with the wealth of photos you have lurking in your home. And, by scanning and sorting pictures, they become the vehicle for teasing out memories that would otherwise be lost.

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Give a gift with meaning.

For Immediate Release
As published 11/18/2009

Contact: Sherry Borzo
515.707.9455
sherry@storiedgifts.com

A truly personal gift that won’t break, go obsolete, or be forgotten

[Des Moines, IA] --The iPhone you gave last year is already outdated. The waffle iron is on the highest shelf, seldom used. The HD TV seems too small now. And your parents don’t want to accumulate any more “things.” Choosing the right gift may seem difficult, but it’s easier than you think, says Paula Stahel, president of the Association of Personal Historians.

“Celebrating a holiday in a down economy gives us a chance to reexamine what matters most and to choose gifts that reflect our deepest values,” says Borzo. “These are the gifts that will be treasured long after the holiday is past.”

The Association of Personal Historians (APH) has put together a list of gift ideas with lasting value for all budgets and circumstances. These gifts are sure to be loved, cherished, and even passed on to future generations. (To read full release and read the suggested gift ideas click Download Holiday Gifts 2009 Press Release 11-9-09.)

At Storied Gifts we produce family histories that are heirlooms for generations. Sherry Borzo researches, designs and delivers professionally published histories that would otherwise be lost forever.

We offer consulting to help people organize and archive photos, media, and other memorabilia. 

Contact us to start saving your family history today. Our phone number is 515.707.9455.